Cuba is full of committed youth

Source:  Granma
october 13, 2017 10:10:59

by: Julio Martínez Molina | informacion@granma.cu

At 34 years of age, Kirenia Viscay de la Cruz, Cuban delegate to the World Festival of Youth and Students and chief prosecutor for the municipality of Cienfuegos for the last two years, is a young person committed to Cuba and its youth.

 

Kirenia Viscay de la Cruz.jpgPhoto: Julio Martínez Molina

Cienfuegos.– Kirenia Viscay de la Cruz is a gentle, tender young woman, whose friendly demeanor and good manners don’t stop her from exercising justice with the necessary rigor.

At 34 years of age, Kirenia, Cuban delegate to the World Festival of Youth and Students and chief prosecutor for the municipality of Cienfuegos for the last two years, is a young person committed to Cuba and its youth.

“The proof is this very office; and not just here, but the rest of the country and our great homeland is also full of selfless and committed youth,” she stated.

“It’s true there are problems, and you see some young people and feel disappointed. Me personally, as someone whose job means you come into contact with lots of unpleasant things, I sometimes get worried; but I feel better when I stop and reflect and see that there are lots more good, committed people, whose valuable examples we must replicate,” she noted.

“We are going to present our country’s successful examples and experiences -numerous and visible every single day – at the World Festival of Youth and Students”

“We are going to present our country’s successful examples and experiences -numerous and visible every single day – at the World Festival of Youth and Students, an event which is also dedicated to our timeless Fidel, eternal compañero and teacher,” stated Cuba’s representative to the international event in Sochi.

fidel y wfdyMother to a five-year old son; an avid reader who loves good Cuban music and can’t stand reggaeton, Kirenia was selected to attend the event given her successful career to date, in particular her years of outstanding work as a provincial prosecutor in the Department of Criminal Proceedings; as well as her constant link with the Young Communist League (UJC) and island’s youth in general.

She joined the UJC in 10th grade, going on to successfully serve as secretary general of its grassroots committees, and a Federation of University Students department president, among other roles.

Kirenia, who was born in Guantánamo, but came to Cienfuegos at three years of age, believes that the best way to support the Revolution, and the country’s social processes, is to try to be a better person, and better professional every day.

Regarding the challenges of her job, Cienfuegos’ chief prosecutor stated, “If you think about the problems we face in today’s society, any job that entails disputes is very complicated, but it is possible to overcome such a challenge.”

Asked how, she noted, “Firstly by gaining – and never losing – the trust of the people as representatives of the Law, by listening to them and trying to understand their problems; and secondly, by doing our best to try to resolve whatever situation they might have, since people come to us because they believe that we are going to resolve their issue.
“What is more, when they don’t get the outcome they want and although we explain why this is so, this person must feel like you care, like you believe them, that you investigated, and tried to help, that you sought the truth.

“To find the truth and act justly, you must be very responsible with what you do and say, be very committed to the Revolution and a just legal system. You must be a passionate lawyer or prosecutor, in love with their profession, because it’s a demanding job,” she noted

Asking nothing in return

Source:  Granma
October 6 2017

by Yenia Silva Correa | informacion@granma.cu

In only 39 years, the young man from the city of Rosario accomplished something not achieved by many who lived a century. He became part of the people’s history and remains so today.

che 21.jpg

Che’s Bolivian Diary contains entries from only the first week of October – the final days of the enduring life of the heroic guerilla. In his summary of the month of September, he wrote, “The army is now showing its effectiveness in action and the bulk of campesinos won’t help us at all, and are becoming informers.”

The proximity of army forces in the area in which Che’s guerillas were moving was a constant theme in his notes, be it a result of chance sightings or news heard on the radio, which as is often the case in such situations, could well contain misinformation purposefully disseminated to put pressure on the revolutionaries.  (Photo: Korda, Alberto)

Broadcast on the radio in fact (October 4), was a commentary that foreshadowed the events, projecting possible scenarios of a trial of the guerilla leader after his capture. The speaker did consider the fact that Che would not give himself up without a struggle, except in extraordinary circumstances like those that eventually occurred.

On October 5 and 6 soldiers were again sighted and the radio reported a disproportionate number of troops searching for the small number of guerillas. It was the prelude to the last note Che would write in his notebook.

October 7, final entry: A chance encounter with a woman crossing their path through the mud and a radio report. Beyond this, the mention of four comrades, but no indication of desperation. This was the human being murdered in Bolivia 50 years ago, who had accumulated much experience in guerilla struggle, both in Cuba and on African soil.

The same man who in December of 1964 had summarized his internationalism in a few phrases before the United Nations General Assembly, saying “… at the moment it may be necessary, I am willing to give my life for the liberation of any Latin American country, without asking anything of anyone.”

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Che Guevara during target practice Photo: Archive

For Che, the idea of death, as part of the revolutionary struggle, was nothing foreign, nor a motive for fear. He was very clear: “In a revolution, one triumphs, or one dies (if it is a real one).” He was true to this principle until the last moment of his life.

Since his untimely death, the tributes to the paradigm of a new man, in every corner of the globe, have not ceased.

In Cuba, 1968 was declared the Year of the Heroic Guerilla. For decades, youth departed for Africa and Latin America to complete internationalist missions, inspired by his example. Hundreds of thousands immortalize his likeness on clothes and in tattoos; others venerate him like a saint; more than a few are committed to disseminating his thought and work.

Part of the people’s history

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Guerrillas in Bolivia. Photo: Cubadebate

In only 39 years, the young man from the city of Rosario accomplished something not achieved by many who lived a century. He became part of the people’s history and remains so today, from the time of his travels across the continent of his birth, and his participation in the Cuban Revolution (first as a Rebel Army Comandante and then playing a leadership role in the country) to his departure to other lands calling for his contribution. Asking for nothing, and giving his all, he left much more than his celebrated “Hasta la victoria siempre” (Forever onward to victory). His exemplary life and action are here. They never die.

Cuba’s Casa de las Américas receives UNESCO Award

Source:  Granma
October 11 2017

by: Prensa Latina (PL) | informacion@granma.cu

casa de las americas.jpgCuba’s Casa de las Américas has become one of the most renowned and prominent cultural institutions in Latin America and the Caribbean

The institution is set to receive the 2017 UNESCO-UNAM/Jaime Torres Bodet Award in Social Sciences, Humanities and the Arts at the beginning of next year.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) announced October 11, that Cuba’s Casa de las Américas will receive the 2017 UNESCO-UNAM/Jaime Torres Bodet Award in Social Sciences, Humanities and the Arts.
In a statement the organization noted that its Director General Irina Bokova, announced the decision which was made on the recommendation of the international judging panel, while the presentation ceremony will take place in early 2018.

The text went on to highlight that the Casa de las Américas was founded in 1959 with the aim of developing and expanding socio-cultural ties with countries from Latin America, the Caribbean and the rest of the world.

Since then the “entity has become one of the most renowned and prominent cultural institutions in Latin America and the Caribbean,” according to the statement.

The Award meanwhile, bears the name of eminent Mexican poet, author, essayist and diplomat Jaime Torres Bodet, also a founding member of Unesco, serving as Director General of the organization from 1948-1952.

Proposed by the Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), the prize celebrates the close ties between the educational institution and Unesco.


casa de las americas

Founded in 1959 by Haydee Santamaría, and currently chaired by Roberto Fernández Retamar, the Casa de las Américas promotes, researches, sponsors, awards and publishes the work of writers, artists of the arts, musicians, theater artists and scholars of literature, and the social sciences of the continent.

Just four months after the triumph of the Cuban Revolution, the Revolutionary Government, by Law 299 of April 28, 1959, created the Casa de las Américas, an institution with its own legal personality, which carries out non-governmental activities aimed at developing and expand socio-cultural relations with the peoples of Latin America, the Caribbean and the rest of the world.

Conceived as a space of encounter and dialogue of different perspectives in a climate of renovating ideas, Casa de las Américas encourages the exchange with institutions and people from all over the world. When all the governments of Latin America, with the exception of Mexico, broke off relations with Cuba, the institution contributed to prevent the total destruction of cultural ties between the island and the rest of the continent. The House disseminated the work of the Revolution and encouraged the visit to Cuba of intellectuals who came into contact with the new reality of the country.

Haydee Santamaría (1923-1980), heroine of the revolutionary struggle, presided over the House of the Americas from its founding until her death in 1980. Her clear and inclusive vision of Latin America, her sensitivity and talent, her generosity and understanding Home your present.

From 1980, the institution was presided over by the painter Mariano Rodríguez (1912-1990), and since 1986 by the poet and essayist Roberto Fernández Retamar (1930)

What did Che Guevara Fight For?

Source:  Moorbey’s Blog / The Dawn News

September 26, 2017

Che Guevara’s daughter reminds us of the reasons behind his revolutionary struggle

By: Aleida Guevara March

che 5.jpgPhoto credit: Politico Scope

In order to speak about the Che Guevara we need time and space, but in order to explain his existence in our times we just need to look around us. If we ask what he was fighting for, the immediate answer is: for a better world. But what does this mean? Decent houses for everyone, free and high-quality education in equal conditions, accessible healthcare for all of the population, peace that would enable us to destine the available resources to research how to have better life. But, what do we really have?

Che’s view of youth

To Che Guevara, youth is the clay with which we can model the New Man. But, what are we actually doing to youth? What kind of life are we offering them? What example are we setting for them? Who can inspire them to perfect their conduct? These are many questions and there are practically no answers—at least not the answers that youth need.

He said: “How long will we continue to have this order that is based on an absurd sense of caste—that is a question I can’t answer, but it is time for our rulers to dedicate less time to propagandizing their virtues as a regime and destine more money—much, much more money—to fund works for the benefit of society”.

What do you think about that? We could say the same thing to many rulers who do a bad job at governing many of our peoples, to begin with.

“… but those people who tackle things head on, who lead by example—to follow or to get others to follow you is a difficult task at times, but it is enormously easier than to push other to get them walking…”

Where do we want to go? What do we need? If we don’t fight for what we need, who will do it for us? It is undeniable that we have strength and courage, but we need unity, we need to organize that strength in order to conquer what we need to modify what doesn’t work, at least for the majority of the people.

“… to be quintessentially human, to be so human that we approach the best qualities of humanity, to purify what’s best in mankind through work, study, the exercise of continuous solidarity with the people and with all the peoples in the world…”

“… to develop sensibility to the maximum, to the point that we feel distressed when a man is killed in any corner of the world, and to feel enthusiasm when in any corner of the world a new flag of freedom is risen”.

That’s what we want for our youth, and it is very important to keep it in mind it now that we’re raising our voices to claim for the life of a young man like Santiago Maldonado, who recently disappeared in Argentina for being on the side of the Mapuche people and defending their rights. What message are they trying to send with the forced disapparition of this young man? Fear, that’s what they want us to feel in order to paralyze us, to silence us.

We can and must fight for that better world

I remember the first time I was in Brazil. Imagine this young woman arriving in Sao Paulo and being told to not roll down the window of the car she’s travelling in, who feels fear for her driver whenever the car has to make a stop at a corner, which is when they assault you, who sees the eyes of a child high on drugs asking for something to eat—my reaction was immediate and I repeat what I said back then: it is better to die trying to change that reality than to avoid dying of hunger. But then I remembered that I come from a different culture, a different people, where the life of a human being, and especially of a child, is sacred, it is the most important thing. I thought I was reacting like this because I am Cuban, and I was raised by the socialist Revolution that we have, but I was wrong.

Later on in my journey I met Mrs. Rosa, in Rio Grande do Sul. She’s a member of the Landless People’s Movement of Brazil. This humble peasant not only said what I was thinking, but she died defending a piece of land with which to feed her children. Mrs. Rosa proved to me that we indeed can and must fight for that better world, no matter where we come from, or which culture we carry with us—what matters and what prevails is the need to live.

“Let me tell you, at the risk of sounding ridiculous, that the true revolutionary is guided by great feelings of love. It is impossible to think of a true revolutionary without this virtue” .

A virtue that is indispensable to be able to give our best for a just cause, even risking our lives. I truly believe in this and I have seen it in the dedication of many men and women, luckily, in many parts of the world.

“And we, the exploited of the world, what role do we play? The peoples of three continents are watching and learning their lesson from Vietnam. Because, with the threat of war, imperialists blackmail the entire humanity: not fearing war is the right answer”.

“Under the slogan ‘We Won’t Allow Another Cuba’ there’s a hidden possibility of widespread aggressions, such as the one perpetrated against Dominican Republic or, previously, the Panama massacre, and the clear sign that yankee troops are willing to intervene anywhere in Latin America where the established order is altered and their interests are threatened”.

The OAS and the UN

“This policy has almost absolute impunity: the OAS is a comfortable mask, however discredited; the UN has a degree of incompetence that borders ridicule or tragedy; the armies of every country in Latin America are ready to intervene to crush their peoples. The internationale of crime and betrayal has been formed de facto”.

Luckily for us, it is not like that anymore for all the peoples, but unfortunately in many the army is still a tool to crush the just claims of our people and one wonders where these men come from, who attack their own people. We’ve seen pictures of these uniformed men repressing demonstrations, attacking youth, women and even children without vacillation, and what do the Magna Cartas say about this? Because I know for a fact that many of them state that the army exists to defend the people and what happens in fact is exactly the opposite—so, whose side is violating the law?

When reading Che’s words today, 50 years after his death, many things still resonate with what we see day to day, the relevance of his thoughts is strong and we should turn to him for answers more often.

There’s plenty to do, and the road is long and difficult, but we can and we must change many things to achieve the full dignity that human beings require in order to live. I always remember something that an Argentine mother had written on the tombstone of her daughter when she found her remains: “if I die, don’t cry for me; do what I did and in you I’ll live”. That is exactly what we owe to the men and women who have given their strength to us through their example, and encourage us to take action. Go on comrades, let’s live in such a way that, when our days come to an end, we don’t feel pain for the years that passed in vain, let’s feel the joy of leaving something beautiful for those to come.

Until Victory Always!

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Nicolás Maduro pays respects to Jose Marti and Fidel Castro

Source:  Granma

August 16 2017

by: Yaima Puig Meneses y Yudy Castro Morales | internet@granma.cu

The Venezuelan President was accompanied by Army General Raúl Castro Ruz, First Combatant Cilia Flores, and Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodríguez  Parilla

raul y nicolas aug 2017 1.jpgPhoto: Estudio Revolución

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro Moros visited the Santa Ifigenia cemetery in Santiago de Cuba, yesterday August 15, accompanied by Army General Raúl Castro Ruz, to pay his respects to Cuba’s national hero José Martí and Comandante en Jefe Fidel Castro, on the 91st anniversary of his birth.

The two leaders, along with First Combatant Cilia Flores, and Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodríguez Parrilla, observed the changing of the guard ceremony at the graves where the remains of Martí and Fidel rest.

The first tribute was to the Teacher, in his mausoleum, where they deposited white roses alongside the single starred flag.

Before the granite boulder that holds Fidel’s ashes, they placed flowers, since the Venezuelan President could not miss a visit on the 91st birthday of the Comandante en Jefe who always championed the Bolivarian Revolution.

The group also paid tribute to July 26 Movement martyrs and those who gave their lives as internationalists after the triumph of the Revolution in January of 1959.

raul y nicolas aug 2017 2.jpgPhoto: Estudio Revolución

In a brief tour of Santa Ifigenia, Raúl spoke with Maduro about Cuba’s history, explaining why Carlos Manuel de Céspedes is considered the country’s founding father; recalling Mariana Grajales and María Cabrales, mother and widow of General Antonio Maceo, respectively; and informing the visiting President about several officers in the War of Independence who are buried in the historic cemetery.

Stopping alongside the tomb of Frank País García, they also left flowers, and Raúl recalled the valiant youth who was murdered, as was his brother Josue, by the Batista dictatorship.

Fidel: An example of revolutionary conviction and permanent faith in victory

Source:  Granma
August 11 2017

Raúl Castro’s words, as early as 1959, summed up the significance of Fidel’s example and his lasting presence among the Cuban people

fidel 1.jpg

“Fidel is wherever work is undertaken; spiritually Fidel is wherever the Revolution advances. Fidel is wherever an intrigue is destroyed, wherever a Cuban is working honestly, wherever a Cuban, whoever he may be, finds himself doing good, wherever a Cuban, whoever he may be, is defending the Revolution, Fidel will be there.”

Cienfuegos, September 5, 1959

Raúl Castro Ruz

Related information

Fidel’s doves

March of the torches across all of Cuba

Source: Granma
January 16 2017

by María Elena Álvarez Ponce | internet@granma.cu

The people united will march the night of January 28, on the eve of the anniversary of José Martí’s birth, from San Antonio to Maisí, with Fidel as always

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Photo: Yaimí Ravelo

The night of January 28

Havana.–From San Antonio to Maisí, for Cuba and Martí, and as always with Fidel, the people united will march the night of January 28, in a tribute to José Martí, on the eve of the anniversary of his birth.

In 168 municipalities 

Confirming the news was Susely Morfa González, member of the Communist Party of Cuba’s Central Committee and the Council of State, first secretary of the Young Communists League (UJC). She reported to the press that marches will take place in 168 municipalities across the country, in which men, women, youth, children, workers, older adults, retirees, homemakers, veteran combatants, and students will fill the nation’s streets to honor the national hero.

The demonstrations of patriotism will begin in unison shortly after 10pm on the night of the 27th, in an unequivocal show of support for the Revolution by a people which is true to its roots, proud of its history, conscious of all that has been accomplished, and confident in the future being constructed, she said.

World Festival of Youth

Together we will raise torches, the flame of life and liberty, as Fidel and his generation did on the first such march held in 1953, Morfa explained, departing from the University of Havana’s Grand Staircase and culminating at the Fragua where the youthful José Martí was imprisoned.

The Young Communist League leader additionally noted that the march will take place after a meeting of the national committee making preparations for Cuba’s participation in the upcoming World Festival of Youth, set to take place this coming October in the Russian city of Sochi. (ACN)