This 15-year-old self-taught engineer is making robots out of his bedroom in Senegal

Fifteen-year-old Cheikh Bamba Diaby is a self-taught robotic engineer –

Africa continues to add to its pool of groundbreaking technological innovations.

The continent also boasts of amazing teens, who are changing the world with their innovations. One of them is 15-year-old Senegalese, Cheikh Bamba Diaby, who is a self-taught robotics engineer.

The Senegalese teen was able to unblock his sister’s mobile phone using tips he learned on the internet.

Pic Credit: BBC

In a bid to fix his sister’s phone without her knowing he had locked it, Diaby went looking for help, but he could not afford the charges. He simply went online and learned how to unlock a phone.

By doing so, he found a passion in developing electronic devices. He now creates robots that perform different tasks using his room as his laboratory.

He has created a motion sensor, a card reader and even an independent car.

Diaby revealed in an interview with the BBC, how he never gave up on electronic devices because of his curiosity.

“My father asked my mother to hide all the electronic devices because I was a stubborn and very curious child,” he said.

Pic Credit: BBC

Diaby said his parents now encourage him to pursue his dream even though they had expressed worry from the start.

Learn more about him from his interaction with BBC’s Alassane Dia in this video:

15-year-old Cheikh was trying to figure out how to unblock his sister’s phone when he discovered a love of fixing electronic devices.

The Senegalese teen is now pursuing his dream of becoming a robotics engineer

Watch video here: https://twitter.com/i/status/1201144418499268609

Marcus Smiles: 126 in the African diaspora granted Ghanaian citizenship

126 diaporans gain ghanaian citizenship 3

126 diaporans gain ghanaian citizenship 4

 

marcus garvey 5

In 1920, the late Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr. presented his famous “Back to Africa” program in New York City. The program encouraged the black community living abroad as slaves to return to their homelands in Africa.

It was part of a social movement dubbed the “Universal Negro Improvement Association” (UNIA), which was founded by Garvey in his native Jamaica in 1914. Through this movement, the celebrated Jamaican political leader intensified black enslavement and racial discrimination sentiments.

Upon his immigration to the United States in 1917, Garvey embarked on a mission to spread his “Back to Africa” mantra, despite frequent backlash from the black middle and professional classes.

“I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there,” Marcus Garvey told his critics.

But in a very short time, the UNIA attracted a lot of followers throughout Africa, Caribbean, Britain and South America, who empathized with the strong sentiments of black enslavement.

Source:  Marcus Garvey Presents His “Back to Africa” Program in New York

In 1947, a Ghanaian student who had studied ten years in the United States, Dr. Kwame Nkrumah returned to Ghana on the invitation of Joseph B. Danquah, his former schoolmaster. Nkrumah would later become Prime Minister. In his fight for the complete independence for the Gold Coast later to be known as Ghana, Kwame Nkrumah acknowledged his political indebtedness to the political teachings of Marcus Garvey.

kwame nkrumahOn September 7, 1957, Ghana became a free self-governing nation, the first member of the British Commonwealth of Nations to become self-governing. Ghana would later develop a Black Star Line patterned after the maritime dreams of Marcus Garvey. My point here is that the African Independence Explosion, which started with the independence of Ghana, was symbolically and figuratively bringing the hopes of Marcus Garvey alive.

Source:  The Impact of Marcus Garvey, John Henrik Clarke

As long as you are a black man, you are an African – Peter Tosh

Cuban Vice President Ines Maria Chapman to Arrive in Kenya Today

Source:  Prensa Latina

March 31 2019

Nairobi, Mar 31 (Prensa Latina) The vice president of the Cuban Council of State and of Ministers, Ines Maria Chapman, will arrive on Sunday in Kenya, the last stopover of a tour of three African countries.
The tour, which also included South Africa and Lesotho, contributed to fostering relations between Cuba and the African peoples.

The Cuban vice president was welcomed by the top government and political authorities in the nations she visited.

At each meeting, participants highlighted Cuba’s role in the independence of this part of the world, as well as its collaboration in several fields, particularly public health.

The vice president, in turn, expressed her country’s gratitude for the strong stance against the economic, commercial and financial blockade the United States has imposed on Cuba for more than six decades.

Latin American, African Nations Lead in Women Representation in Parliament

Source:  TeleSUR
March 8 2019

latin_americanx_african_countries_lead_with_women_legislatorsPiedad Cordoba (left), Sahle-Work Zewde (center), Cristina Fernandez (right)
are major political figures in their countries of origin, | Photo: EneasMx – Reuters

Out of the top 10 countries in the world with women in parliament, nine are located in Latin America and Africa.

Despite remaining challenges, Women have come a long way in politics. Almost a century after gaining the right to vote in most parts of the world, women now have a seat at the table  serving as lawmakers and even leading their country’s parliaments. And in this category, Latin American and Africa lead the way.

RELATED: UN: Women Losing Colombian Congressional Seats, Representation

According to the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), as of December 2018 out of the top 10 countries in the world with high numbers of women in parliament, nine are located in Latin America and Africa. Rwanda has the best record for women representation, with nearly two-thirds of its seats currently held by women.

Cuba and Bolivia

The African nation is followed by two other countries with more women in parliament than men – Cuba and Bolivia. The rest of the group is made up of four other Latin American and Caribbean countries – Mexico, Grenada, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica – and rounded out by two more African nations – Namibia and South Africa.

“A world where women have equal opportunities as men in political, social and economic spheres, is crucial towards creating a comprehensive sustainable development and improving the livelihood for all,” Kenyan Senator Sylvia Kasanga said as part of the #BalanceforBetter campaign luanched by the global network of female politicians, Women Political Leaders (WPL).

In the United States, 2019 marked a historic year for the number of women sworn into office in the 116th Congress. A record 127 will serve as congresswomen, 106 Democrats and 21 Republicans according to the Center for Women and Politics at Rutgers University.

Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Names such as Ilhan Omar stand-out as she became the first Muslim congresswoman, along with Rashida Tlaib and Latina Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest elected congressperson in the country’s history.

However, the U.S. is far from equal representation as it stands on the IPU list in the 139th position with 19.6 percent of women in Congress. At the same time Latin America, as a region, has increased its percentage of women lawmakers by 20 percent from 1990 to 2018 reaching 30 percent.

As the World Economic Forum indicates, quotas reserved for women can explain this increase as they are a common factor in many of the electoral systems with more women as legislators and MPs. One of the first countries in the world to introduce such a law was Argentina in 1991.

Since then policies aimed to put forward a certain proportion of female candidates have been applied across Latin America and in other nations in the Global South. Also, the improvement of education access for women has to be taken into consideration.

African Nations Condemn Intervention, Interference in Venezuela

Source:  TeleSUR
February 10 2019

sadc condemns interference in venezuela.jpgSADC meeting showing the various flags of the African group’s member
countries. | Photo: Reuters

The South African Development Community issued a letter condeming actions by the United States and its allies against Venezuela.

The South African Development Community (SADC), a group consisting of 15 African nations, issued a statement condemning the violation of international law in U.S. backed coup actions against Venezuela.

RELATED  We Don’t Want Another Vietnam War in Latin America: Maduro

In a letter dated Feb. 10, President of the Republic of Namibia and chairperson of SADC Hage Geingob noted the community’s concern with “attempts by the leaders of some countries to interfere in the affairs and sovereignty of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela.”

The letter relates to the Jan. 10 self-declaration of Juan Guaido, a hitherto unknown lawmaker in Venezuela’s National Assembly in contempt since 2016, as interim president of Venezuela, and the subsequent recognition of him by the United States and some of its Latin American and European allies.

Since that event, United States President Donald Trump has made several threatening statements against the democratically-elected government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, saying that he won’t rule out military intervention.

Meanwhile governments around the globe have called for dialogue in the country rather than aggression, and have supported Venezuela’s right to self-determination.

SADC Secretariat@SADC_News

Chair H.E. @hagegeingob expresses solidarity with Venezuela & notes with concern attempts by leaders of some countries to interfere in Venezuela’s affairs & sovereignty https://www.sadc.int/index.php?cID=2702  @CyrilRamaphosa @EdgarCLungu @OfficialMasisi @edmnangagwa @DIRCO_ZA @sardcnet

The development group consists of 15 countries whose main goal is: “to achieve development, peace and security, and economic growth, to alleviate poverty, enhance the standard and quality of life of the peoples of Southern Africa, and support the socially disadvantaged through regional integration, built on democratic principles and equitable and sustainable development.”

Among its members are: Angola, Botswana, Lesoto, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

Benin to the British: Return the artefacts stolen from us in 1897!

Source:  The Nation

December 22 2018

edofest benin.jpeg

The Edo State government has intensified call for the return of artefacts stolen from Benin Kingdom by the British colonialists in 1897, with an exhibition of photographs of the prized artworks and their locations in Europe and America. 

benin ivory mask

Unveiling the photographs inside a gallery at the palace of the Benin Monarch, Omo N’ Oba N’ Edo, Uku Akpolokpolo, Oba Ewuare II, in Benin City, at the ongoing Edo Festival of Arts and Culture (EDOFEST), Commissioner for Arts, Culture, Tourism and Diaspora Affairs, Hon. Osazee Osemwegie-Ero, said that the state government would continue to advocate for the return of the stolen artefacts.

He explained that the state government chose the Edo Festival for Arts and Culture (EDOFEST) event to scale up the campaign, in order to reach more people with the message, adding that “the artefacts represent part of the Benin history.”

He noted that the Governor Godwin Obaseki-led administration has made provision for N500 million in the 2019 budget of the state, for the establishment of a Benin Royal Museum in collaboration with the Oba Palace, where the artefacts would be kept on return.

Prof. Greg Akenzua commended the organisers of the photo exhibition, and disclosed that the palace of the Benin Monarch, was working with 13 museums to establish the Benin Royal Museum in the state.He maintained that the call for the return of looted artefacts across the world was gaining traction, citing the French President, Emmanuel Macron, who has promised that his country would return some of the stolen artefacts to their original owners.

“We are working with 13 museums who have agreed to work with us in the establishment of the Royal Museum. We have set a timeline of three years to put the structures on ground,” Prof. Akensua added.

Dr. Lutz Mukke, a German journalist and academic, who took the photographs of the looted Benin artefacts, said the photographs were the result of his journalistic investigation into the looted Benin artefacts at different museums around the world.

He disclosed that up to 90 per cent of the important cultural artefacts were taken away from Africa, and suggested that a “new deal” between Africa and the Western world was needed to fast-track the return of the stolen artefacts.

He maintained the stolen Benin artefacts numbering 4,000 to 6,000 could be found in about 60 Western museums with the biggest collections in the British Museum in London, Ethnographical Collections in Berlin, Metropolitan Museum of Arts in New York and Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

He also said that the German government has called on all public museums housing about 1000 looted Benin artefacts to return them.

“The photographs shown in the exhibition are from the museums in Boston and New York in the United States of America; Vienna in Austria; Stockholm in Sweden, Con Berlin, Dresden, Munich and Leipzig in Germany and London, United Kingdom.

“The artefacts are of course priceless as cultural heritage, but that does not mean we should forget their pure money value. The stolen Benin artefacts are estimated to be $1 billion” Mukke said