Clarification regarding Argentine doctors trained in Cuba

Sources:  GranmaJuventud Rebelde
January 6 2016

The Tatú Project clarified today that reports by various media outlets regarding the nullification of medical credentials of Argentine doctors trained in Cuba are false

from  Prensa Latina | internet@granma.cu

project tatu.jpg

The Tatú Project group clarified today that reports by various media outlets regarding the nullification of medical credentials of Argentine doctors trained in Cuba are false.

Concerning the confusion, Tatú Project, composed of young graduates from the Latin American School of Medicine (ELAM), noted, “There is no legal way to nullify credentials once the qualification has been awarded.”

In the event that a graduate’s credentials are questioned, there exists an accord within the framework of the Vienna Convention which ensures that their status is protected for two years from the date the query is submitted, explains Tatú Project, whose members provide health services to residents in poor areas of Buenos Aires under the maxim “A dignified life for all.”

The group also clarified that “it is the Ministry of Education and not the Ministry of Health or the nation’s Health Minister, Dr. Jorge Lemus, as press reports have stated, which has the authority to recognize qualifications.”

The project’s director, Gino Straforini, commented to Prensa Latina, “We are eternally grateful to Cuba, her people and Fidel Castro, because without this great feat of Latin Americanist solidarity, we would never have become doctors.”

Unfounded information, creating great confusion

The statement by the group also added, “We regret that many sympathetic press agencies have reproduced this unfounded information, creating great confusion.”

Questioned on January 5 regarding the situation, Patricio Ancarola, spokesman for Argentina’s Ministry of Health, refuted claims that sector minister Dr. Lemus had made such a decision.

Over the last 17 years ELAM has trained tens of thousands of young doctors from 60 countries, including the United States. During this time, more than 600 Argentine students have graduated from the institution.

In honor of Che

che smiling.jpg

The Tatú Project began in 2005 in Buenos Aires when several graduates from the Havana-based Latin American School of Medicine , ELAM, decided to offer free doctor consultations in poor neighborhoods after finishing their regular shifts at the hospitals where they were working.  The project pays tribute to Argentinean-Cuban doctor and revolutionary Commander Ernesto Che Guevara and takes it’s name after the pseudonym used by Che while he was supporting the Congolese Revolutionary Movement in the 1960s.

Source:  Clarification regarding Argentine doctors trained in Cuba

2 thoughts on “Clarification regarding Argentine doctors trained in Cuba

  1. Hopefully, the clarification by the Tatu Project about the rumors regarding the nullification of the medical credentials of Cuban trained Argentine doctors is not only true but will remain so.

    The latter hope is important for at least three (3) key reasons. First and foremost, if the right-wing oligarchy government of Marci now entrenched in power in Argentina since the recent presidential elections should be foolish enough to rescind the credentials of Cuban trained Argentinian doctors, thousands of poor Argentinians will probably die for want of medical care. The latter would clearly be not only unacceptable but very costly for the poor and the working poor in the land of the unforgettable Commandant Ernesto ” Che” Guevara, himself a medical doctor who fought alongside Fidel and the victorious Cuban revolutionaries in 1959.

    Second, as politically bitter and socially undesirable as the annulment of the credentials of the Cuban trained Argentine doctors would be, it should be recognized and accepted as a distinct possibility, now that the oligarchy and imperialism have a government that is willing to do their biddings as of the last presidential elections in 2015. The issue is not whether the Marci Government has the political power to rescind the Argentine doctors medical credentials, instead it is whether they are willing to accept the potential political and social costs that such an action is likely to have for them. The latter costs will be dependent on the ability of the progressive movement in Argentina to impose such costs on the Marci government by mobilizing potentially tens of thousands of poor Argentines who benefit from the services of the Cuban trained doctors. However, it will equally represent a political measure of the constraint of the Marci government to risk its already fragile standing amongst the poorer classes in Argentina given its pro-oligarchy and pro-imperialist class character. To rescind the medical credentials of the Argentine Cuban trained doctors would represent an early short term isolation of the Marci government from the poorer classes, though the latter does not deny its power to take this unpopular measure should it decide to rule by repressive means. The bigger question is perhaps whether the government of Marci is willing to trade-off longer term political power objectives for shorter term ones.

    Finally, in the context of the preceding points, how feasible is it that the Marci government may have floated the idea of nullifying the credentials of the Cuban trained doctors to its agents in the media so as to get an assessment of the balance of forces and therefore the disposition of the population for this potential action? If the latter hypothesis has any merits, it is quite possible that the Marci government and the oppressive classes it serves may be uncertain about how to proceed to try to destroy this particular program of the former populist government and more importantly to isolate Cuba.

    So what may appear to be a confusing rumor in the media about the nullification of the medical credentials of Cuban trained local doctors may well be a politically calculated and deliberate action on the part of the oligarchy’s government to seize up the social forces regarding an important social policy that benefits thousands of Argentina’s poorest citizens.

    As such, as the government of the oligarchy and imperialism in Argentina maneuvers to uproot the populist policies of Cristina Fernandez’s government and her late husband, it is worthwhile to be vigilant as to not only its policy attitude towards the Cuban trained local doctors but also its policy attitude towards Cuba, Venezuela, Ecuador and other progressive governments in Latin America.

    “Peace begins when the hungry is fed”

  2. Hopefully, the clarification by the Tatu Project about the rumors regarding the nullification of the medical credentials of Cuban trained Argentine doctors is not only true but will remain so.

    The latter hope is important for at least three (3) key reasons. First and foremost, if the right-wing oligarchy government of Marci now entrenched in power in Argentina since the recent presidential elections should be foolish enough to rescind the credentials of Cuban trained Argentinian doctors, thousands of poor Argentinians will probably die for want of medical care. The latter would clearly be not only unacceptable but very costly for the poor and the working poor in the land of the unforgettable Commandant Ernesto ” Che” Guevara, himself a medical doctor who fought alongside Fidel and the victorious Cuban revolutionaries in 1959.

    Second, as politically bitter and socially undesirable as the annulment of the Cuban trained Argentine doctors would be, it should be recognized and accepted as a distinct possibility now that the oligarchy and imperialism have a government that is willing to do their biddings as of the last presidential elections in 2015. The issue is not whether the Marci Government has the political power to rescind the Argentine doctors medical credentials instead it is whether they are willing to accept the potential political and social costs that such an action is likely to have. The latter costs will be dependent on the ability of the progressive movement in Argentina to impose them on the government by mobilizing potentially tens of thousands of poor Argentines who benefit from the services of the Cuban trained doctors. However, it will equally represent a political measure of the constraint of the Marci government to risk its already fragile standing amongst the poorer classes in Argentina given its pro-oligarchy and pro-imperialist class character. To rescind the medical credentials of the Argentine Cuban trained doctors would be an early further short term isolation of the Marci government from the poorer classes, however, the latter does not deny its power to take this unpopular measure should it decide to rule by repressive means. The bigger question is perhaps whether the government of Marci is willing to trade-off longer term political power objectives for shorter term ones.

    Finally, in the context of the preceding points, how feasible is it that the Marci government may have floated the idea of nullifying the credentials of the Cuban trained doctors to its agents in the media so as to get an assessment of the balance of forces and therefore the disposition of the population for this potential action? If the latter hypothesis has any merits, it is quite possible that the Marci government and the oppressive classes it serves may be uncertain about how to proceed to try to destroy this particular program of the former populist government and more importantly to isolate Cuba.

    So what may appear to be a confusing rumor in the media about the nullification of the medical credentials of Cuban trained local doctors may well be a politically calculated and deliberate action on the part of the oligarchy’s government to seize up the social forces regarding an important social policy that benefits thousands of Argentina’s poorest citizens.

    So as the government of the oligarchy and imperialism in Argentina maneuvers to uproot the populist policies of Cristina Fernandez’s government and her late husband, it is worthwhile to be vigilant as to not only its policy attitude towards the Cuban trained local doctors but also its policy attitude towards Cuba, Venezuela, Ecuador and other progressive governments in Latin America.

    “Peace begins when the hungry is fed”

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