World Health Organization describes Cuba’s health system as exemplary

Source:  Granma
October 21 2015

by: Prensa Latina(PL) | internet@granma.cu

Margaret Chan, general director of the World Health Organization (WHO), described Cuba’s public healthcare system as an example to be followed, emphasizing its sustainability and ability to respond to emergency situations

cuban health systemCourtesy of Cuban medical brigade in Nepal

GENEVA.— Margaret Chan, general director of the World Health Organization (WHO), described Cuba’s public healthcare system as an example to be followed, emphasizing its sustainability and ability to respond to emergency situations, during an assembly meeting of the Interparliamentary Union, yesterday, October 20.

Chan highlighted Cuba’s spirit of solidarity, especially the country’s contribution to training healthcare professionals from Third World countries, and the important role played by Cuban professionals in combating Ebola in West Africa.

Leading the Cuban delegation to the event was National Assembly deputy Yolanda Ferrer, who commented that it was gratifying to hear the praise expressed by Chan, adding that Cuba’s health care system has been capable of offering its best to those in need around the world, while maintaining and consolidating the population’s health, despite the impact of the U.S. blockade.

Source:  World Health Organization describes Cuba’s health system as exemplary  Granma

Related articles:

One thought on “World Health Organization describes Cuba’s health system as exemplary

  1. Dr. Chang, the WHO Director General is correct. Cuba’s health care system has earned international fame for its ability to respond to national and international health emergencies, its capacity to continue training thousands of doctors, nurses and other health practioners from developing countries and some from developed countries, its ability to deliver heavily subsidized high quality health care services to its own people and very importantly its emphasis on preventive medicine.

    However, there are some important shuttle points that Dr. Chang’s praise of Cuba’s health care system have implied that should be made more explicit in my opinion.

    First, it seems reasonable and even logical to infer that Dr. Chang’s praise of Cuba’s health system is simultaneously an implicit praise of the Cuban revolution itself without which Cuba’s health care system that has done so much to improve and sustain the health of its own people and peoples all around the world would not have solicit the notice let alone the public praise of the WHO’s chief. Clearly, it is the socialist revolutionary leadership of Cuba and its people who have strategically designed, moulded, guided and invested hundreds of billions of pesos in the state driven health care system in Cuba. It is indeed this state driven health care system and not a ” free market” for profit, privatized health system that has saved millions of lives in Cuba and globally. It is the same state driven health care system built and guided by the revolution that has the capacity to respond to health emergencies nationally and internationally and it is also this state driven health care system that has trained thousands of health practioners that no doubt has saved perhaps tens of thousands of lives every year in all regions of the world. This is the health care system that the WHO’s chief has had the human decency and the courage to salute. Her stance on Cuba’s health care system and by implication its revolution which makes it possible should be made explicit since at least in my view the two things are intertwined and inseparable.

    Secondly, the WHO’s chief fortitude to publicly applaud Cuba’s health care system and all it has done to save lives nationally within Cuba and globally as in the fight against Ebola in West Africa earlier this year must be seen in the context of the huge constraints of the criminal US blockade against Cuba for nearly 55 years. Now think along with me for a minute, if the Cuban revolution with all the economic and financial strictures of the US blockade was able to create such a comparatively robust health care system, isn’t it reasonable to assume or even to conclude that without the blockade , the revolution would be able to deliver an even more robust and extensive health care system? For example this incredible asset ” Jamaicans in Solidarity with Cuba” recently reported that the Cuban government stated that since the imperialist blockade was imposed on Cuba the losses to the health care sector alone are nearly US$3 billion. Imagine if the revolutionary government of Cuba had those nearly $3 billion dollars available to them over the last 50 plus years how many more clinics, hospitals, doctors and nurses and radiologists would have been trained to serve Cubans and foreigners alike. Let’s imagine how many more potential doctors, nurses, blood technicians, radiologists and medical researchers would have been trained by the Cuban revolution for Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America and even America! So if Dr. Chang of the WHO is so impressed with Cuba’s health care system now, then in the absence of the criminal US blockade against Cuba, she would probably embrace the revolution itself which would have had more resources to make the health care system even more impressive. Thus, Dr. Chang’s public praise of Cuba’s health care system should probably extend to her public call for the removal of the blockade which clearly hampers the growth and progress of all facets of Cuban life including the health sector as recently stated by the Cuban government. I believe that public and international leaders and technocrats should increasingly take public stances on what is right and against what is wrong. The latter is implicit in Dr. Chang’s public praise of Cuba’s health care system and it should be made explicit.

    Thirdly, it seems reasonable and perhaps even logical to assert hopefully without putting words in the WHO’s chief’s mouth (as she is more than capable of doing that) that he public praise of Cuba’s health care system for the earlier cited reasons that her praise is an implicit praise of Cuba’s anti-imperialist revolution which leads one to infer that she has objectively critiqued imperialism for imposing so many economic and financial strictures on Cuba’s health system via the blockade. Thus, it seems reasonable to assert that Dr. Chang recognizes that Cuba’s health care system could have accomplished even more than it has had it not been for the US imperialist blockade as discussed earlier. Thus for Dr. Chang to be consistent for her praise of Cuba’s health care system nationally and internationally, she has to be critical of imperialism which has robbed Cuba of enormous resources through the blockade which could have significantly improved its medical and technological capacities to amplify its national and international roles.

    Finally, Dr. Chang’s honesty to praise Cuba’s health care system is no doubt a salutation of Cuba’s extraordinary role as a WHO member country in fighting the Ebola outbreak in West Africa earlier this year. Cuba sent hundreds of doctors and other health practioners to West Africa to fight the spread of the disease which because of the US blockade on Cuba created some financial discomfiture for the WHO in terms of providing the financial allowances of Cuba’s health practioners on the ground in West Africa. That is probably an implicit acknowledge of Cuba’s role in the Ebola crisis that should be made more explicit. Clearly, Cuba’s outstanding role in fighting the deadly Ebola crisis was made possible by its health care system which is made possible by its revolution. The implicit usually buries the interconnections between things and the explicit I exposes them to sunlight.

    “Peace if you are willing to fight for it” Fred Hampton

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s